Boilerplate for a containerized plain Ruby application

Boilerplate for a containerized plain Ruby application

Recently I've been poking around automation in order to experiment and build software on destroyable environments, so that I won't mess up with my operating system host.

That's where virtualization and containerization can help: I want to stand on a fast and destroyable environment which can be re-launch as many times as I want.

Virtualization

In this Gist I share how to launch an Ubuntu environment on the host using a lightweight VM manager, called multipass.

Virtualization is not the focus of this post, as you can check the Gist for further details.

Containerization

Throughout this post, I will present how to build a plain Ruby containerized application using just Docker and Makefile, such that the boilerplate can be reused everytime we want to create a new app.

Makefile

Let's create the Makefile, which can be a centralized entrypoint for the commands we want to run. It's a good practice to have a Makefile in every app.

Makefile

console:
  docker run \
    --rm \
    -it \
    -v $(pwd):/$(basename $(pwd)) \
    -w /$(basename $(pwd)) \
    ruby:2.7 \
    bash

Makefile is composed by targets. Each target can run a specific task which in turn can be a single command or a set of commands. In our example, we are running the docker run along with its options:

  • docker run: creates a new container based on an image
  • --rm: will remove the container on exit
  • -it: allows a pseudo-terminal to interact
  • -v $(pwd):/$(basename $(pwd)): mounts the current directory from host to container
  • -w /$(basename $(pwd)): sets up the default working dir on container
  • ruby:2.7: the image from which the container will run. Docker tries to find the image locally, otherwise downloads it from a Docker registry
  • bash: the command executed on the container. bash will request a pseudo-terminal to interact

We can test the target by running:

make console

It will open the bash from the container.

docker-compose

Docker command options can be verbose quickly as we add more complexity to our application. As a means to make it easier to use Docker in development, we can declare our container specification in a single file that can be reused.

Docker comes with docker-compose to solve that problem.

docker-compose.yml

version: '3.9'

services:
  dev:
    image: ruby:2.7
    container_name: my-application
    working_dir: /my-application
    volumes: 
      - ./:/my-application

Now, we can change our Makefile to use the docker-compose command:

Makefile

console:
  docker-compose run dev bash

And check it:

make console

The above configuration does the same job as running docker run with volume option, working dir, image and so on.

Less. Verbosity.

Test-driven

Intending to bootstrap our application with TDD, the first file we create is the test file, which runs a simple dummy test. It seems silly, but enough for the purpose of this boilerplate, being able to be enhanced at a later time.

As for Ruby, we're gonna use test-unit.

app_test.rb

require 'test/unit'

class AppTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def test_dummy
    assert_equal 1, 1
  end
end

However test/unit does not come with this standard Ruby, making us to include the gem separately.

Gemfile

source 'https://rubygems.org'

gem 'test-unit'

Now we can run make console, and then from inside the container, run the command to install the gem from Gemfile:

bundle install

Ruby will place the gems by default on /usr/local/bundle.

Named Volume

We can't forget that everytime we run make console, a new container will be created, losing all the gems we have installed. As the application grows, running bundle install can be onerous.

Let's use a named volume to use the host as a "cache":

docker-compose.yml

version: '3.9'

services:
  dev:
    image: ruby:2.7
    container_name: my-application
    working_dir: /my-application
    volumes: 
      - ./:/my-application
      - rubygems:/usr/local/bundle

volumes:
  rubygems:

By doing this way, Docker will use this named volume in host for the gems placed at /usr/local/bundle from running containers.

Running the test

As for now we are able to run the test:

make console
bundle
ruby app_test.rb

Improving the test command

Instead of entering the console everytime to run the test, we can run it directly upon container creation:

docker-compose run dev ruby app_test.rb

The, improving our workflow is easy as follows:

Makefile

console:                                    
  docker-compose run dev bash               

utest:                                      
  docker-compose run dev ruby app_test.rb

Entering the console to run stuff:

make console

Running the test:

make utest

Conclusion

The purpose of this article was to share a way of creating the boilerplate for a containerized Ruby application, allowing us to experiment and play on destroyable environments, remaining our OS host untouchable.

 
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